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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good idea to bring back that $1 trillion sitting out there. how to do that, it remains to be seen. but then that
gobernador jerry brown ha propuesto. vo --pero brown en una junta del consejo administrativo hoy dijo que eso seria un sueÑo mas que una realidad. --para poder tener fondos para el proximo aÑo escolar, la universidad seÑalo que necesitaria 371 millones de dolares, para cubrir los incrementos en salarios de mantenimiento y equipo para 23 campus, a lo que brown dijo estaria deacuerdo en aprobar 125 millones mas bajo la condicion de que los costos de colegiatura no suban. cesar ---nueva pausa pero al regresar, take vo ---el mandatario de bolivia, evo morales, dice tener buenas noticias sobre la salud del presidente de venezuela hugo chavez.. take vo - blanca ---en mexico, las autoridades continuan examinando a ms de 50 perros presuntament e vinculados a la muerte de 5 personas.. take sot segment ends blanca ---el presidente de bolivia, evo morales, asegur hoy que el mandatario venezolano hugo chvez, operado hace ms de un mes en "la habana" por cncer, est en fisioterapia para volver a su pas. take vo ---morales no precis si se comunic con chvez directamente, solo seÑal: "antier y ayer me comu
. >> i am patti ann browne. thank you for watching fox and friends first. it is time now for the t5@5:00. >> american pastor was convicted simply for being christian. he has been sentenced to 8 years for tat the most brutal prison. >> usually when they go after somebody because they are christian or convert they don't say that. the state media today which was in the courtroom in this surprise trial where they announced his conviction and sentence in less than a week as you said they put in their own article. they say his crime and what he was convicted of was intentional attempt to undermine the national security of the iranian government by being involved in house churches from 2001 to 2005. >> the state department is now calling for his release saying we condemn iran's violation of universal right of freedom of religion we call on him to respect his rights and release him. >> another miracle on the hudson they managed to get out of the sinking plane. they were in the water for hours. >> we had a visual on them and we were trying to head them off. they were going southbound at a pr
? without objection. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i ask unanimous consent to dispense with the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i rise today to celebrate the career and the calling of a remarkable ohio expan a close friend, reverend dr. lynnwood h. channel berlin. our pasty, woody, and his wife peggy are important to connie and me and to our whole community in lorain. the evangelical lutheran church of america, of which i'm a member, embraces the motto, "god's work, our hands." it means moral imperatives must be the concern of every citizen. in his 31 years of service to the first lutheran church of lorain, ohio, pastor woody has labored for love and for justice. he's been doing god's work, as his wife peggy, supporting those who suffer, celebrating our community's joys, and being concerned with every citizen. pastor woody's been a counselor and a friend to many. his words, his attentiveness, his patient
minutes past the hour, i am patty and brown with your fox news minute. then yahoo! called early elections three months ago expecting and easy victory. the leader must now build a coalition after a strong showing by a new party. he is expected to keep his job. much of the u.s. experiencing the coldest temperature and two years. four deaths are blamed on the cold snap. entergy nuclear manually shut it down on monday. it was the second shut down this month and the six in the past two years. those are your headlines. back to melissa and lori. lori: many thanks. secretary of state hillary clinton defending the response and benghazi. >> we were misled that there were supposedly protest. that was easily -- >> the american people could have known that within days. >> with all due respect, the fact is we had four dead americans. what difference, at this point, does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again, senator. lori: secretary clinton will face members about the house in about 40 minutes. it is time for lou dobbs now. l
with that. and because of that, i was able to do that, our secretary of commerce, ron brown, asked me if i would chair at the 50th anniversary of the united nations the africa lunch which the u.s. was doing at that time. which i did. he said if you can do that, then you can take care of anything else, bill. so, i mean, there have been a lot of people. you mentioned secretaries of treasuries here in the united states, certainly the various heads of the fed and central bankers i think worldwide. i think one of the things that we need to see more of getting to the point that i know you wanted me to talk about is we need the leadership. and we haven't seen the tough leadership in europe that we need to see to get out of crises. we were very lucky in the case of the latin american debt crisis that we had paul volcker at the fed, and we had jacques dela rosier at the international monetary fund. and, you know, because the world -- people forget now, it was so long ago, in the early '80s it was about to go under. in fact, they compared it to moving deck chairs on the titanic. and that worked out.
on "worldwide exchange" from davos. we'll be joined with mike brown. we'll get right to him when we come back. >>> as we can see the focus for the economy in davos, we can see mining and commodity experts. they think they're pretty optimistic for what's to come this year. here is a recap. >> i'm actually a little bit more optimistic that 2013 will see us recovering and, therefore, we take the view that the oil prices for 2013 and that will actually not slow down the growth. as we can see, things coming back. i'm confident that the gold price will continue to go towards 1,800. considering that given any other uncertainties and certainties about, for example, the yen, the new bank of japan policy on inflation targeting, there are a number of very attractive investment assets. >> despite the global economic downturn, 100, 110 has been pretty stable. most of the screens project around the $80 level, 8el 0 to 90, i would say. and governments in the region oil producing governments tend to budget at that sort of level. natural gas, of course, a much bigger variation and the u.s. has become competit
on inauguration morning. her choice this time, coat and dress by american designer tom brown. we tracked him down at his hotel in paris. celebrating the moment. >> can you never predict, you know, life to happen this way. i'm just so fortunate. i'm so honored and so proud that she's -- she chose mine. >> for this occasion, the 47-year-old designer chose fabric for the first lady based on men's silk ties. >> i had an idea that the president would be wearing navy. so i wanted to do something that would -- that she would look really good with him. and i chose a dark navy pattern which is a tisilk jacquard fabr that i have used in my men's collection. >> for this designer, this moment represents name recognition, a potential for big business and largely he has one woman to thank. >> style coming from me is somebody that has that confidence to be able to be their own person and be that true individual that they are and i think she definitely will go down in history as that. >> clearly the first lady making her mark on fashion history. we'll have the designer of first lady michelle obama's dress live i
, this is a browning, 3-0-6. and this is a popular round because of this capabilities at long range differences on big game in the u.s. and i will show you that one. [shooting] >> there we go. that's the hunting rifle. >> sean: you were a little off on that last shoot. >> i know, i probably flinched a little bit. >> sean: you were rushing. >> okay, the next gun i want to show you the firearm, a beretta 12 gauge. semi automatic like the 30-0-6 and ar-15, two different shells one is a slug and one is the water round. and i shoot this in competition, and it's good for hunting, recreational shooting and also, competitions like i do. so let he me show you that real quick. . [shooting] >> there we go. as you can see, we have some different sizes in the calibers here and if you want i can go down range and show you quick. the thing i want to show you, the 223, the big bad scary rifle, ar-15 this is the impact that the projectile made out of it. over here the 30-0-6 bigger than the ar-15 the vuing is a lot bigger than the 30-0-6 and last are this pattern, i mean, you can see the difference, so, what i wante
to pull the trigger each time like you saw, this is a browning, 3-0-6. and this is a popular round because of this capabilities at long range differences on big game in the u.s. and i will show you that one. [shooting] >> there we go. that's the hunting rifle. >> sean: you were a little off on that last shoot. >> i know, i probably flinched a little bit. >> sean: you were rushing. >> okay, the next gun i want to show you the firearm, a beretta 12 gauge. semi automatic like the 30-0-6 and ar-15, two different shells one is a slug and one is the water round. and i shoot this in competition, and it's good for hunting, recreational shooting and also, competitions like i do. so let he me show you that real quick. . [shooting] >> there we go. as you can see, we have some different sizes in the calibers here and if you want i can go down range and show you quick. the thing i want to show you, the 223, the big bad scary rifle, ar-15 this is the impact that the projectile made out of it. over here the 30-0-6 bigger than the ar-15 the vuing is a lot bigger than the 30-0-6 and last are this pattern
the keys to the caddy, like elvis. i was driving around in that brown cadillac. >>gretchen: this must be every guy's dream to be a host of this show driving these cars. tell us what you do. how do you soup them up? >> depends on what the episode is about. we try to come up with ideas of what we want to do. i remember the first time -- >>steve: got to be dangerous but got to be funny. >> remember the game atari? i said i want to put guns on cars. i want to play tank battle. the executive producer went brilliant. that's when i realized, there is no adult in the room. we can get away with anything. we actually went to mexico in these cars. we put pinatas on the backs of the cars. we're trying to actually break pinatas. we decide what the episode is going to be about. i get my own episode. i wanted to teach the guys to play football so i mounted an air cannon in a car to play football and put nets on the other guy's cars. we played football, running into each other. >>steve: are you surprised when the check clears? that sounds like so much fun. >> it's not only stupidity fun. we get to dr
jerry brown is putting in place right now to make sure most of the oil companies that come in go through certain stages and protocol. takes about eight to nine months to get a permit. if you drill within the location, drill on a permit you've been granted you're able to drill in california. i think, in the united states in general, with the economy growing the way it is and the oil industry, it is for seen thing that will happen in the future throughout the united states. these emerging shale plays are here to stay. cheryl: okay. if you look at the, go back to california. i think this is so interesting. the eia did a report and said actually oil production, crude production in california has been on the decline since about 2006, basically the wells could be tapped here. do you think that's a possibility, or do you think the oxy find is a sure thing, a sure bet? >> right now looks like it is a sure bet. there is a some shale spoken about for, many years now and oxy, what they have done, they have drilled deeper targets. the oil is there. it is there from conventional production early on i
to jerry brown giving his state of the state of dress last week. -- address last week. [video clip] >> half a million students enrolled in community colleges in 2008. transition from one segment to another is difficult. the community colleges are all working on this. the key here is thoughtful change working with the faculty and college students. but tuition increases are not the answer. i am not one to let your students in california to become -- [indiscernible] [applause] california was the first in the nation to pass president obama's historical affordable care act. it will provide insurance to nearly 1 million californians. over the rest of the decade, california will steadily reduce the number of insured. today i am going to hold a special session to deal with these issues. the broader expansion of medicare is incredibly complex and will take more time. we are taking relationships with the county's -- it will not be achieved overnight. great prudence should guide every step of the way. california lost 1.3 million jobs in the great recession. but we are coming back at a faster pace than
interesting is that, or, if i may make the comparison, when brown v. board of education was decided, i think it was understood as an incredible affirmation of the humanity and civil rights of african americans. >> desegregating the public schools. >> desegregating the public schools, rejecting separate and unequal. but the truth was, it really didn't desegregate the schools even until today. roe v. wade, which was won, the whole idea of women's equality under the constitution was in its infancy. there had been almost no decisions in 1973 recognizing discrimination against women as prohibited by the constitution. roe v. wade comes down, and it's not understood as an affirmation of women's personhood, that we don't lose our human rights when we become pregnant. but almost overnight the public health situation dramatically improved, not only because women had access to legal abortion, but they didn't have to carry to term pregnancies when they weren't healthy. and so it was a dramatic change in the practicality. but what we're still very much fighting is an understanding and a respect for the f
designer thom browne. we tracked him down at his hotel in paris. celebrating the moment. >> you can never predict life to happen this way, and i'm so fortunate, so honorsed that she chose mine. >> reporter: the 47-year-old designer choes fabric based on men's silk ties. >> i had an idea that the president would be wearing navy, and i wanted to do something where she would look really good with him. and i chose a dark navy tie, which actually a silk jacquard fabric that i have used in my men's collection. >> reporter: for this designer, this moment represents name recognition. a potential for big business. and largely he has one woman to thank. >> a style icon for me is somebody who has the confidence to be able to be their own person and be the true individual that they are, and i think she definitely will go down in history as that. >> reporter: i am sure style wise that will be her legacy. as for jason wu, he told "women's wear daily," mrs. obama likes to keep her secrets. he surprised me again. she's really good at it. and he said he thought the country was ready to see a confident fir
for the elections since chairman brown's election in february 1989 with minor modifications to allow for the unique circumstances faced at the meeting. i'll turn to secretary herman for an expolice station of the rule -- explanation of the rules of procedure. >> good morning. thank you very, very much, jim. jim has outlined the process of how we will begin. i will start with reminding this body of the specific provisions that are contained in our charter and bylaws that guide the election of offices for the party. after that, my co-chair will come back to the podium and then review with this body what we are specifically recommending to govern these elections today. first, i shall remind this body that the rules of procedures contain the following key provisions. first, that candidates for any dnc office position had to file a nomination statement with the dnc secretary by 8 p.m. sunday, january the 20th, 2012, and that included -- sorry, 2013. that really would have been a problem. >> yeah. [laughter] >> that included signatures of at least 20dnc members. each candidate for chair is entitled to a
in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strudel. so delicious...so fun. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? from silver screens... to flat screens... twizzlerize your entertainment everyday with twizzlers the twist you can't resist. cook what you love and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there's wiggle-room in the ten commandments is what you're te
are not going to save their way by brown bagging their lunch back to financial health, shall we say. so i think that consumers understand inflation is part of the package. and are willing in modest dosage to accept it. it's certainly been the history of panera. in fact, we quarterly survey consumer sentiment on value, and the value scores on panera have remained over the last five years. >> ron, are you seeing a movement -- let's talk about the health. you've got some very well-posted calorie menus. you've got a 417 calorie asian chicken salad that is terrific. are you seeing people staying away from the high calorie and going for the low calorie? >> jim, you know it. just like your investors, consumers are intelligent. they understand. all they want it do is be treated with respect and dignity. the way we do that is we give them the information. there are others, a broad swatch of panera's menu that is very good for you, low calorie, low fat, really very, very good. you can eat very well at panera. there are also items that are inactual gent. we let you know to make your own decisions. >> how
that really has a lot of interest. we have dark brown line of communications, which is the military's complicated word for roads, that go to afghanistan. and that route is critical to the supply of our troops. >> they were conditions, not cuts. >> on top of that, we had intelligence cooperation. our folks rebuild -- were able to cooperate on a run in pakistan. that is one of the ways we were able to get some of the lady in -- osama bin laden. was there permissiveness and allowing our people to be there that help us be able to tie the knot that focused on that to some degree. not exclusively, obviously, but to some degree. in addition, they have lost some 6000 people just in the last year in their efforts to go after terrorists. they have lost about 30,000 people over the course of the last several years because they have been willing to engage the insurgencies. there are things that the pakistanis have done. as complicated as the relationship has been. i intend to raise the issue of doctor rafridi with of them, i can promise you that. but i do not think it is wise to just cut our as
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)